Block thirty-six

Block thirty-six designed by Kerry Foster

Block thirty-six designed by Kerry Foster

This block uses traditional needle turn applique pieces with no raw edges, but you can choose to sew them down with your machine – as I did – if you don’t fancy sewing by hand. Feel free to add more leaves to the outside of the wreath – I chose to pair mine up inside and out.

You must be logged in to view block thirty-six.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty-six designed by Kerry Foster

Fabric and cutting guide

Download the template pages here

[1] 9½” square of fabric one (Kerry used a white and gold fabric)
[1] fat quarter of fabric two (Kerry used a green print fabric)

You will also need a dissolvable pen, a scrap of card, aluminium foil and appliqué pins or basting glue.

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Cut a 10″ square from fabric two and then cut it diagonally into two triangles. Sew the triangles back together into a polygon with the diagonal cuts (bias edge) on the outside. Press seams open. Draw lines on the back of the fabric as shown a scant 1″ apart along the longest edge and work your way across the whole piece. Don’t use a Frixion pen because you will need to press this again and you need the lines to stay.

Step one

Step one

Step two: Bring the two sides together so that the lines run into each other. Offset by one line and pin. Sew together. Press the seam open as best as you can, and then cut along the line (with scissors) – it will just be one continuous line, so you will get a continuous strip of bias tape! You will need no more than 38″.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Fold the fabric one square in half and then half again and press the point to mark the centre. With a soluble pen, mark 1½” from the centre of each of the edges.

Step four

Step four

Step four: Align the end of the bias tape with the top of the bottom line and pin in place. Ease it in a curve until you get the next centre point and pin in place. Repeat until you are back at the beginning.

Step five

Step five

Step five: Snip off most of the surplus bias tape and fold under the end. Pin over the top of the starting end to hide the raw edge.

Step six

Step six

Step six: Ease the curve out between the pins so that it is round and pin as you go. Press in place if you used a fusible bias tape maker, removing the pins as you go. If you didn’t, you can leave the pins as they are or use a glue pen to stick in place.

Step seven

Step seven

Step seven: Copy the template onto card or you can use Mylar template plastic as it won’t melt and cut out on the line. Stack a piece of foil, a piece of fabric face down, and the template as shown.

Step eight

Step eight

Step eight: Work your way around the edge folding the foil smoothly over the edges and wrapping the fabric around the template as it does so. Press the foil on both sides with a hot iron but BE CAREFUL, leave it for a little while before flipping as it will be seriously hot. Once cooled a little, unpeel the foil and pull of the fabric. You may be able to reuse the foil once or twice more. This is how they will look front and back. Make 16.

Step nine

Step nine

Step nine: Position the first four as shown; make sure you have a 3/8″ distance at least from the outside leaves with the edge of the background. Glue or pin in place. Continue with the remaining eight leaves as shown.

Stitch down as you like. You can either stitch it down by hand like traditional needle turn applique, or you can machine it down with a straight stitch, a tiny blind hem or a tiny zig zag.

Note:

You can use a ½” bias tape maker if you wish, following the instructions that come with it. I used one with fusible web but if you haven’t got one, don’t worry. Fold the sides to meet in the middle along the whole length, pressing as you go.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

Kerry

Connect with Kerry from Pennydog

Instagram

Block thirty-five

Block thirty-five designed by Crystal McGann

Block thirty-five designed by Crystal McGann

Today we are going to go backwards and do a reverse appliqué! I really love how effective this simple block is. A perfect opportunity to show off a feature print if you like, or you could always take it a step further and piece a little block to show off in the middle? I’d love to see what you come up with for the middle.

You must be logged in to view block thirty-five.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty-five designed by Crystal McGann

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 9½” square of fabric one (Crystal used a teal and pink print fabric)
[1] 9½” square of fabric two (Crystal used a white solid fabric)
[1] 6” square of fabric three (Crystal used a black and white print fabric)

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Mark the middle of your fabric two fabric square by folding and pressing on the diagonals. Place the fabric one and two squares right sides together. Center a bowl (with a diameter of approximately 5½”) in the middle of the squares and trace around it using a pen or pencil.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Sew along the drawn line. Trim the inside of the circle away, leaving a ¼” seam allowance. Clip the seam allowance right the way around. Turn the squares in the right way,  pressing the inside circle well, so that the seam lays flat.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Position your fabric three square under the circle and pin or glue in place. Top stitch around the circle, sandwiching all three layers in place. Trim back the underside of the seam, including fabric two.

Note:

The fabric two square is the same size as the front so you have enough fabric to hold onto in order to manipulate it back in place. You should be able pull both pieces back to 9½” square. You should use a lighter weight fabric if possible, noting that it won’t be seen in the block once it is finished.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

IMG_3284

About Crystal from Raspberry Spool

Crystal is the other half of Project 48 Quilt and the creative force behind Raspberry Spool. Her personality and modern, fresh attitude to quilting is shown through her designs, which gives quilters an opportunity to inject their own personality into their quilts as well.

Connect with Crystal

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Block thirty-four

The website is experiencing a couple of minor performance issues. The membership and printer functions are being upgraded. The posts are currently public to minimise disruption for our members. Sorry for any inconvenience. Linden and Crystal.

Block thirty-four designed by Jo Avery

Block thirty-four designed by Jo Avery

I love to needle-turn applique and often use flowers and leaves as my inspiration. But
as this was ‘modern applique’ I wanted the design to look a little edgier than my usual
compositions, though it still needed to be attractive enough for quilters to want to
make it! So it was a tricky design process and I spent a long time planning and
thinking about this design. In the end I tried to subvert some traditional flowers and
leaves by using simple shapes and making the design very stylised and graphic. The
use of a dark charcoal grey accentuates the modern look and the pinks and turquoises
add some prettiness, but this design would work well in any colours. The shapes
should all be very easy to work even for those new to applique.

You must be logged in to view block thirty-four.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty-four designed by Jo Avery

Fabric and cutting guide

Download the template pages here:
Part one | part two | part three

Print the template pieces page with the printer settings set to no scaling or 100%. Print parts 1 and 2 of the pattern and stick them together along the broken line.

[1] 10” square of fabric one (Jo used a low volume print)
[1] 8” square of fabric two (Jo used a dark fabric).
Cut [2] stalks using template A and [8] dots using template D.
[4] 2” x 2½” rectangles of fabric three (Jo used a variety of pink prints).
Cut [4] flowers using template C.
[4] 3” x 5½” rectangles of fabric three (Jo used a variety of turquoise prints).
Cut [16]  leaves using template B.

Instructions

Step one: fold your fabric square in half twice for a centre cross guideline. Trace the pattern on to the right side of your fabric using a pencil, a Frixion pen or your preferred method for temporary marking. If you can’t see the pattern lines easily through your fabric try taping to a window, your computer screen with the light turned up, or go over the pattern lines with a thicker pen.

Step two

Step two

Step two: begin by appliqueing the stalks that cross in the centre of the block. Pin or baste a stalk piece over the drawn lines. Using the needle-turn applique method turn under your raw edges and stitch down using a tiny neat slip stitch and matching thread (photo 1). There is no need to turn under and stitch the ends that will be covered by the flowers. repeat with the other stalk, this will cross over the first one and lie on top.

Step three

Step three

Step three: using the same method stitch your leaves and flowers down (photo 3 and 4).

Step

Step four (picture one)

Step four (picture two)

Step four (picture two)

Step four: the dots are quite tiny so you may find the following method helpful. Cut out the centre circle (broken line) from the paper template D. Using a double thread sew a tiny running stitch close to the edge of a fabric dot. Put your paper dot in the centre, wrong side up, and draw up your thread. Secure with a few stitches. Press from both sides and then pop out your paper dot. Using matching thread stitch down in place as before.

Step five

Step five

Step four: once all your applique is complete, press well and then trim to a 9½” block.

Notes:

  • I’ve suggested starting off with a slightly larger piece of fabric for the background
    and trimming once complete as the edges will fray while you are working.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

jo

About Jo from myBearPaw

Jo spent most of her childhood sewing and making things and made her first quilt almost 30
years ago. She owns her own teaching studio and fabric store in Edinburgh, Scotland,
organises the Stitch Gathering, an annual one-day quilting retreat, teaches around the UK
and Europe and spends the rest of her time designing and making quilt for magazines and
books. She is still writing her blog after over 7 years and recently launched The Thread
House, a quilt patterns and retreat venture alongside two other UK quilters Lynne
Goldsworthy and Karen Lewis.

Connect with Jo

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

The Thread House | The Stitch Gathering

 

Block thirty-three

Final Pic

Block thirty-three designed by Linden Vine

You must be logged in to view the tutorial for block thirty-three.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty-three designed by Linden Vine

Fabric and cutting guide

Download the template page here

Print the template page with the printer settings set to no scaling or 100%. 

[1] 3½” x 9½” rectangle from fabric one (Linden used a white self-striped fabric)
[1] 3″ x 9½” rectangle from fabric two (Linden used a green pattern on white fabric)
[1] 4″ x 9½” rectangle from fabric two (Linden used a green pattern on white fabric)
A selection of small scraps from fabric three (Linden used a navy blue floral fabric)
[1] 3½” x 9½” rectangle of Applifix or other fusible webbing (Vliesofix or similar)

Instructions

Tracing

Step one

Step one: Using a light box or window, trace the letters onto the paper side of the Applifix. You need to be sure you are tracing them ‘backwards’ so that they appear the correct way when ironed onto the fabric.

Laying the Letters Out

Step two

Step two: Lay the Applifix letters onto the back of the scraps. Using a dry iron, press the letters down firmly. Cut the letters out using small, sharp pointed (paper) scissors.

Ironing it On

Step three

Step three: Lay the original paper print out onto your ironing board, followed by the 3½” x 9½” rectangle from fabric one to centre the design. Carefully peel the paper off the back of the letters and place them down onto the 3½” x 9½” rectangle from fabric one, centering the design. Using a dry iron, press the letters down firmly.

Step four: Stitch the 3″ x 9½” rectangle from fabric two to the top of the feature block and the 4″ x 9½” rectangle from fabric two to the bottom.

Step five: Choose a small straight stitch length (about 2.2) on your machine with a clear or open toed applique foot, stitch carefully around the letters and numbers using a matching thread. If your machine has a lock stitch you can use that so you don’t have to tie the ends in.

Notes

  • You can stitch the letters down using buttonhole stitch or a zig zag stitch on the machine if you don’t want to use raw edge applique.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting.
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise.
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting.
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

[/wpmem_logged_in]

Linden-Vine-201x300

About Linden from Vine Lines Creative

Linden is the Creative Director of Vine Lines Creative and co-creator of Project48Quilt, a year long sampler which blends traditional and modern quilting methods.  Linden’s background is in arts administration and she has been quilting for twenty years, an art form which has now become her profession.  Linden is a designer and teacher and enjoys writing about quilting and running a creative business through her blog.

Connect with Linden

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

Block thirty-two

Block thirty-two designed by Hilary Jordan

Block thirty-two designed by Hilary Jordan

Hi everyone! I am very excited to be sharing my Modern Fussy Cutting block with you today. I love fabric and have been steadily growing my stash since I started quilting in 2012. Fussy cutting is such a fun way to feature some of your favorite fabrics, and my block was inspired by an art gallery. Each little box is like a picture hanging on the wall 🙂 I used some of my favorite Lizzy House fabrics in coordinating green shades, but feel free to use whatever you want for your fussy cuts!

You must be logged in to view block thirty-one.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty-two designed by Hilary Jordan

Fabric and cutting guide

Fussy cut the following from fabric one (Hilary used a variety of prints):
[1] 3¾” x 4¼” rectangle – piece A
[1] 2½” x 5¾” rectangle – piece B
[1] 1¾” x 3” rectangle – piece C
[1] 2¼” x 3” rectangle – piece D

Cut the following from fabric two (Hilary used a white solid):
[2] 1¼” x 5¾” rectangles
[1] 1¼” x 3¾” rectangle
[1] 1¼” x 4” rectangle
[2] 1½” x 8¼” rectangles
[2] 1½” x 9¾” rectangles
[1] 1½” x 1¾” rectangle
[1] 1” x 4” rectangle
[1] 1½” x 4¼” rectangle
[1] 2¼” x 3” rectangle

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: To assemble each of your fussy cut units…

  • Unit A: Stitch the 1½” x 4¼” rectangle from fabric two to the top of fussy cut piece A.
  • Unit B: Stitch the [2] 1¼” x 5¾” rectangles from fabric two to the top and bottom of fussy cut piece B.
  • Unit C: Stitch the 1½” x 1¾” rectangle from fabric two onto the bottom of fussy cut piece C. Stitch the 1” x 4” rectangle from fabric two to the right side of your unit.
  • Unit D: Stitch the 2¼” x 3” rectangle from fabric two onto the top of fussy cut piece D. Continue by stitching the 1¼” x 4” rectangle from fabric two onto the right side of piece D. Finally stitch the 1¼” x 3¾” rectangle from fabric two onto bottom of the unit.

Step two: Stitch Unit D to Unit A and Unit C to Unit B.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Stitch the [2] 1½” x 8¼” rectangles from fabric two to the top and bottom, along the 7¾” side. Stitch the [2] 1½” x 9¾” rectangles from fabric two to the sides of the block. Press and trim to 9½” square.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

Hilary

About Hilary from Young Texan Mama

Hilary is a quilter and sewist from Houston, TX. She started Young Texan Mama shortly after her first son was born as a mommy blog, but quickly fell in love with the quilting and sewing blog community.

Connect with Raylee

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Block thirty-one

1finished fussy cut dresden plate block

Block thirty-one designed by Raylee Bielenberg

The possibilities for fussy cutting with repeating piecing are never more apparent than with a dresden plate. Your dresden can change drastically all by the placement of the design on the fabric.

I wanted a block that would show the repetition side of fussy cutting and piecing and how that can create its own new pattern within the block by the play of colours against each other.

I have also fallen in love a little with dresden plates as they are such a versatile block and quickly pieced, the fussy cutting takes the longest. They also look a little like a sunflower which is my favourite (in case you didn’t know)

You must be logged in to view block thirty-one.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty designed by Raylee Bielenberg

Fabric and cutting guide

Download the template page here

Print the template pieces page with the printer settings set to no scaling or 100%. Measure the 2” test square on the template page to ensure the page is printed correctly. Transfer them to template plastic and cut neatly.

[1] 9½” square of fabric one (Raylee used a cream print)
[1] 3½” square of fabric one (Raylee used a red print)
[16] 3″ x 2″ fussy cut rectangles of fabric two. (Raylee used a red print)

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Position the template on the fabric, identify a good design to repeat and cut [16] dresden blades. Choose a centre design and cut [1] using the circle template.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Fold the blades in half rights sides together along the long edge and sew along the widest end. Chain piecing is the fastest way for this step. Trim the corner and turn the dresden blades the right way out. Finger press the seam open to reduce bulk, then press carefully with an iron, making sure the points are turned through neatly.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Piece the blades in sets of [2] continuing to press the seams open to reduce bulk. Continue piecing the sets until you have all dresden blades joined and you have a circle of pieces. Press really well using starch if you wish.

Step four

Step four

Step four: Sew a large running stitch on your machine around the centre circle keeping the thread tails long. (Don’t cut them off neatly, you’ll only have to sew it again!)

Step five

Step five

Step four: Using the top thread, pull up the circle to gather it and aim to have your gathers as evenly distributed as possible. This won’t need too much gathering as we are just creating a smooth seam allowance folded in on the circle. Take the circle to your ironing station and flatten with your hand and then finesse until you are happy with the circle – press well, use starch if you like.

Step five: Take your background piece and fold in half both ways finger pressing to create a gentle crease to centre your dresden plate on. Pin in place and sew around the points either by hand or machine.

Step six: Place your centre circle in place and pin carefully. Sew around the circle to complete your block. Press one more time to remove the creases and set your stitches.

Notes:

  • I have used only one fabric for the dresden plate, giving me a repeat on all blades. Optionally you can alternate the fabric with another, or you could have four fabric choices but this will affect the fussy cutting repeat effect on the finished block.
  • The centre circle shows fussy cutting for placement as opposed to the repetition achieved in the blades.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

Raylee0033 700x466

About Raylee from Sunflower Stitcheries and Quilting

Wife, Mum, longarm quilter, designer, teacher.

I have been sewing for as long as I can remember and started quilting professionally 7 years ago in an effort to complete some of the quilt tops my Mum and I had made and also be available for my family, I am very pleased to be able to work from home. I have sewn garments and other projects as well as quilts. I enjoy sharing my love of patchwork and quilting and recently I began teaching which has been a lot of fun.

Connect with Raylee

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Ello | Google + | Flikr | Tumblr

Block thirty

Block thirty designed by Crystal McGann

Block thirty designed by Crystal McGann

Fussy cutting… We were never great friends… but over time, I’m growing to like her more and more. This block takes the fuss out of fussy cutting and lets you easily show off your favourite bit of the fabric print.

You must be logged in to view block thirty.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block thirty designed by Crystal McGann

Fabric and cutting guide

Fabric and cutting guide

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 4” square (approximately) of fabric one, cut to centre your feature print (Crystal used a novelty print fabric)
[20] 1-3″ x 9½” strips of fabric two (Crystal used a variety of prints)

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Place your first strip from fabric two along the top of your feature print, right sides together. Sew your seam against the edge of the strip, press into place and trim back. Going clockwise, keep sewing your strips down to the edge of the feature print until you have completed all sides.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Keep sewing your strips down clockwise, stitching, flipping and pressing until your block is large enough to trim back to 9½” square.

 

Note:

Depending on your feature print, you may wish to go around in a square, pentagon or hexagon. The shape is completely up to you!

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

IMG_3284

About Crystal from Raspberry Spool

Crystal is the other half of Project 48 Quilt and the creative force behind Raspberry Spool. Her personality and modern, fresh attitude to quilting is shown through her designs, which gives quilters an opportunity to inject their own personality into their quilts as well.

Connect with Crystal

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Block 29 – Traditional Fussy Cutting from Linden Vine

Final
Final

Block twenty-nine designed by Linden Vine

Introduction

I love fussy cutting!  There are so many ways it can be used – hexagons, kaleidoscopes etc.  I’ve created an easy block this week to show how simple fussy cutting can be.

You must be logged in to view the tutorial for block twenty-nine.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block twenty-one designed by Linden Vine

Fabric and cutting guide

[2] 2½” squares from fabric one (Linden used a white floral) NOTE: all must be exactly the same (see step one)
[2] 4½” x 3″ rectangles fabric two (Linden used a dark pink scallop)
[2] 9½” x 3″ rectangles fabric two (Linden used a dark pink scallop)
Instructions

Step one: We’re going to start by making the fussy cut four patch. Find a fabric that has a distinct repeat of approximately 2½” and at least four repeats in the strip.  Cut a 2½” strip.
Cut [1] 2½” square which has a pleasing pattern. Layer this square onto the strip and cut [3] more, exactly the same.

I find it helpful to place a pin through all [4] layers to ensure they are exactly the same.

Pins in Place

Step two

Step two: Take the [4] squares and lay them out to create a suitable design. Lay the first square down, flip the next square 90 degrees, then the next and the next. Here are two possible designs I came up with using my four squares.

Plan 2

Option one

Plan 1

Option two

When you find a design you’re happy with, sew the pieces into a four patch block.

Step three: Take the [2] 4½” x 3″ rectangles and join to either side of the four patch.  Press towards the rectangles.

Step four: Take the [2] 9½” x 3″ rectangles and join to the top and bottom of the block.  Press towards the rectangles.

Notes

  • This block looks difficult, but if you break it down into its parts and have patience, you’ll be fine!
  • You’ll find starch to be very useful, especially for the small pieces.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting.
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise.
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting.
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

[/wpmem_logged_in]

Linden-Vine-201x300

About Linden from Vine Lines Creative

Linden is the Creative Director of Vine Lines Creative and co-creator of Project48Quilt, a year long sampler which blends traditional and modern quilting methods.  Linden’s background is in arts administration and she has been quilting for twenty years, an art form which has now become her profession.  Linden is a designer and teacher and enjoys writing about quilting and running a creative business through her blog.

Connect with Linden

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

Block twenty-eight

Block twenty-eight designed by Paula Storm

Block twenty-eight designed by Paula Storm

This week we are doing things a bit differently, Paula has made us a video for how to complete her flower block. Theres a bit of appliqué involved, but I think you will agree that it’s an amazing block.

You must be logged in to view block twenty-eight.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block twenty-eight designed by Paula Storm

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 10” square of fabric one (Paula used a light print)
[21] approximately 6″ squares of fabric two (Paula used eight different fabrics)
[1] approximately 6″ squares of fabric three (Paula used an orange fabric).

Download the applique template here

Instructions

Step one: Print your template onto two a4 sheets at ‘actual size’. Create templates using heavy card or freezer paper for the three petal sizes and the middle circle. Cut your templates out.

Step two: Cut your petals a 1/4″ bigger than your templates and baste your seams around the templates. Use starch and iron well to maintain your shape. Once your petal has set, pull the template out and continue until you have [7] sets of petals, in [3] different sizes and one middle circle.

Step three: Lay your petals and circles out on your block following the template. Your flower will overlap your block slightly. Baste your flower to your fabric one square once you are happy with the positioning.

Step four: Stitch your flower down using a whip stitch or by machine if you prefer.

Step five: Trim your block down to size (9 1/2″ square).

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

paulawebprofile

About Paula Storm from Paula Storm Designs

Paula designs sewing patterns and tools for Quilters and sewers. More importantly though, she’s a mum to the 4 most beautiful children on the face of this planet.

Not that she’s biased or anything. 😉 

Connect with Paula

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Block twenty-seven

Block twenty-seven designed by Crystal McGann

Block twenty-seven designed by Crystal McGann

Making flowers in July seems like a perfect antidote to Australia’s winter. This week, we even saw snow in our nations capital – which is certainly very exciting. It’s so rare that it snows in the city, actually lands and hangs around long enough to capture it. I couldn’t resist taking a photo of the block in the shimmering snow, or a dusting as our Project 48 member Sue calls it.

You must be logged in to view block twenty-seven.

[wpmem_form login]

[wpmem_logged_in]

Block twenty-seven designed by Crystal McGann

Fabric and cutting guide

[4] 5” square of fabric one (Crystal used two different pink prints)
[12] 4″ x 6″ rectangles of fabric two (Crystal used a grey solid)

Instructions

Step one

Step one: On the wrong side of your fabric one squares, draw a triangle coming from one corner of the square (using the picture as a guide). No need to measure, just try to keep the points about a 1/4″ in from the edge for seam allowance.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Place a fabric two rectangle under the top of the triangle, right sides together, over lapping the edges by a 1/4″. Flip the rectangle over and back into place to make sure the whole piece will be covered when it has been sewn and pressed into place. Stitch using the drawn line as a guide and trim back the seam allowance. press the piece open.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Repeat step two for the other two sides of the triangle. Press the unit well and trim back to 5″ square. Continue making the units until all [4] units are completed.

Step four: Sew the [4] units together to finish the block.

Note:

You can reduce the bulk in the centre seam by loosening a few of those end stitches and massaging the seams open. Press all four seams in alternate directions.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
    [/wpmem_logged_in]

IMG_3284

About Crystal from Raspberry Spool

Crystal is the other half of Project 48 Quilt and the creative force behind Raspberry Spool. Her personality and modern, fresh attitude to quilting is shown through her designs, which gives quilters an opportunity to inject their own personality into their quilts as well.

Connect with Crystal

Website | Facebook | Instagram

1 2 3 4