Block twenty-eight

Block twenty-eight designed by Paula Storm

Block twenty-eight designed by Paula Storm

This week we are doing things a bit differently, Paula has made us a video for how to complete her flower block. Theres a bit of appliqué involved, but I think you will agree that it’s an amazing block.

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Block twenty-eight designed by Paula Storm

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 10” square of fabric one (Paula used a light print)
[21] approximately 6″ squares of fabric two (Paula used eight different fabrics)
[1] approximately 6″ squares of fabric three (Paula used an orange fabric).

Download the applique template here

Instructions

Step one: Print your template onto two a4 sheets at ‘actual size’. Create templates using heavy card or freezer paper for the three petal sizes and the middle circle. Cut your templates out.

Step two: Cut your petals a 1/4″ bigger than your templates and baste your seams around the templates. Use starch and iron well to maintain your shape. Once your petal has set, pull the template out and continue until you have [7] sets of petals, in [3] different sizes and one middle circle.

Step three: Lay your petals and circles out on your block following the template. Your flower will overlap your block slightly. Baste your flower to your fabric one square once you are happy with the positioning.

Step four: Stitch your flower down using a whip stitch or by machine if you prefer.

Step five: Trim your block down to size (9 1/2″ square).

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
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About Paula Storm from Paula Storm Designs

Paula designs sewing patterns and tools for Quilters and sewers. More importantly though, she’s a mum to the 4 most beautiful children on the face of this planet.

Not that she’s biased or anything. 😉 

Connect with Paula

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Block twenty-seven

Block twenty-seven designed by Crystal McGann

Block twenty-seven designed by Crystal McGann

Making flowers in July seems like a perfect antidote to Australia’s winter. This week, we even saw snow in our nations capital – which is certainly very exciting. It’s so rare that it snows in the city, actually lands and hangs around long enough to capture it. I couldn’t resist taking a photo of the block in the shimmering snow, or a dusting as our Project 48 member Sue calls it.

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Block twenty-seven designed by Crystal McGann

Fabric and cutting guide

[4] 5” square of fabric one (Crystal used two different pink prints)
[12] 4″ x 6″ rectangles of fabric two (Crystal used a grey solid)

Instructions

Step one

Step one: On the wrong side of your fabric one squares, draw a triangle coming from one corner of the square (using the picture as a guide). No need to measure, just try to keep the points about a 1/4″ in from the edge for seam allowance.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Place a fabric two rectangle under the top of the triangle, right sides together, over lapping the edges by a 1/4″. Flip the rectangle over and back into place to make sure the whole piece will be covered when it has been sewn and pressed into place. Stitch using the drawn line as a guide and trim back the seam allowance. press the piece open.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Repeat step two for the other two sides of the triangle. Press the unit well and trim back to 5″ square. Continue making the units until all [4] units are completed.

Step four: Sew the [4] units together to finish the block.

Note:

You can reduce the bulk in the centre seam by loosening a few of those end stitches and massaging the seams open. Press all four seams in alternate directions.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
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IMG_3284

About Crystal from Raspberry Spool

Crystal is the other half of Project 48 Quilt and the creative force behind Raspberry Spool. Her personality and modern, fresh attitude to quilting is shown through her designs, which gives quilters an opportunity to inject their own personality into their quilts as well.

Connect with Crystal

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Block twenty-six

Block twenty-six designed by Anorina Morris

Welcome to my block, at Project 48. Upon researching a traditional flower block (and by researching, I mean following link after link and getting completely distracted on Pinterest), I decided to create a simple block. I created my block with some absolutely beautiful Confetti Cottons by Riley Blake Designs, but feel free to use any fabric you like to make it your own.

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Block twenty-six designed by Anorina Morris

Fabric and cutting guide

Fabric and cutting guide

[4] 2 1/4″ x 4 1/8″ rectangles of fabric one (Anorina used a white solid)
[4] 2 3/4″ squares – cut across a diagonal to yield 8 HSTs fabric one (Anorina used a white solid)
[4] 2 1/4″ squares of fabric one (Anorina used a white solid)
[4] 2 3/4″ squares – cut across a diagonal to yield 8 HSTs of fabric two (Anorina used a yellow solid)
[4] 2 1/4″ squares of fabric three (Anorina used an orange solid)
[1] 2 1/4″ square of fabric four (Anorina used a red solid)

Instructions

Step one: Place a fabric one and a fabric two half square triangle (HST) together, with right sides together. Sew along the long edge. Repeat this for the remaining HSTs. Press to the darker side. Trim the HSTs to 2 1/4″ square (use a Bloc Loc ruler for greater accuracy).

Step two

Step two

Step two: Refer to the image (above) to lay out the block components. Begin by sewing the components into pairs. Return them back to the flat surface to ensure correct position and rotation, and then sew the next section. Sew into [5] rows and then sew the rows together.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
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Anorina-2-copy-e1379637899941

About Anorina Morris from Samelia’s Mum

I picked up a needle and thread around 7 years ago. What started as a hobby and a way to connect with other women (while I was home with 2 very young children), quickly became my passion. You can find my projects regularly in Australian craft magazine publications, or lots of free patterns and tutorials over on my blog – Samelia’s Mum.

Connect with Anorina

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest

Block twenty-five

Block Twenty-Five – Traditional Flower Block by Linden Vine

Introduction

This month is all about flowers.  We’re in the midst of winter here in Canberra so I’m looking forward to visions of Spring with all your beautiful blocks.

Flower Block designed by Linden Vine

Flower Block designed by Linden Vine

My block is a combination of piecing, fussy cutting and applique.  You are welcome to decide what form of applique you would like to use – I used Vliesofix and will secure with raw edge when I quilt it.

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Block twenty-five designed by Linden Vine

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 3½” x 9½” rectangle square from fabric one (Linden used a white striped tone-on-tone)
[2] 3½” x 4½” rectangles from fabric one (Linden used a white striped tone-on-tone)
[2] 3½” squares from fabric one (Linden used a white striped tone-on-tone)
[1] 3½” x 1½” rectangle from fabric two (Linden used a green floral)
[1] 3½” x 9½” rectangle from fabric three (Linden used a dark pink polka dot)
Scraps of floral fabric, suitable for fussy cutting.  At least one big flower; some small flowers are also optional.

Instructions
Step one – Flower Stem:
Stitch the two [2] 3½” x 4½” rectangles from fabric one to each side of the 3½” x 1½” rectangle from fabric two, to create the stem of the flower.  Press towards the darker fabric.

Step two – Flower pot:
Take the 3½” x 9½” rectangle from fabric three and the [2] 3½” x 4½” rectangles from fabric one. Draw a diagonal line on each triangle and stitch to each end of the rectangle, as you did for the flying geese units, noting the different position.
Trim ¼” outside the line and press away from the triangle.

Stitched Flying Geese

Stitching the squares to the rectangle

Finished Flying Geese

The finished flower pot unit

Step three – Joining the Rows:
Take the 3½” x 9½” rectangle square from fabric one and the two units you’ve just made and following the diagram, stitch the rows together to make the block.
Press seams towards the top of the block.

Main Block before the flowers are attached.

Step four:
Take your large floral fussy cut flower and attach to the block using your favourite applique method, either needleturn, buttonhole or raw edge.  We’ll be looking further at applique in a subsequent month.

Flower Block designed by Linden Vine

Flower Block designed by Linden Vine

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting.
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise.
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting.
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

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About Linden from Vine Lines Creative

Linden is one of the creators of Project48Quilt and has been quilting for almost twenty years. Quilting combines her love of fabric and all things symmetrical and she’s enjoying letting loose a little and improvising through her exploration of Modern Quilting. As well as running a creative business consultancy and pattern testing agency, Linden works and teaches at her LQS.

Connect with Linden

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

Block twenty-four

Block twenty-four designed by Stacey Day

Block twenty-four designed by Stacey Day

I am a traditional quilter at heart. My grandmother taught me to quilt, and no matter what I chose, she would just teach me how. She never once told me something might be too hard or why don’t we try something smaller. It was always “Okay, here’s how it’s done.” All of my piecing and construction skills were not only taught by her, but she also explained the whys of the so-called rules of quilting.

This particular block is a known traditional block, and easily falls into the category of either a chain block or a Lemoyne Star block. I call it a Spinning Star, but you may find it listed under the name Wrapped Star. I like it because there are no matching seams in the diamond sections, but you still get to piece some movement into the block. I chose a known block because I wanted the focus to be on construction technique.

Traditional construction relies heavily on precision piecing and accurate seam allowances. Before you get started, make sure your machine is set at a perfect scant 1/4″ seam allowance by finding the exact 1/4″, and moving your needle off that by a millimeter (one needle width). If you have a walking foot, I suggest using it to help deal with the bias edges in the block. You will also need a removable marking pen, I use a Frixon pen but go with whatever you are comfortable with.

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Editors note: If you haven’t sewn Y or set in seams before – this tutorial bEdyta Sitar of Laundry Basket Quilts will help you on your way.

Block twenty-four designed by Stacey Day

 

Fabric and cutting guide

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 1 7/8″x 20″ strip of fabric one (Stacey used xxx fabric)
[1] 5″ square of fabric one (Stacey used xxx fabric)
[1] 1 7/8″x 20″ strip of fabric two (Stacey used xxx fabric)
[1] 1″ x Width of fabric strip of fabric three (Stacey used four different green prints)

Editors note: If you would prefer a solid star, cut  [1] 2 1/2″ x width of fabric strip of fabric three and skip the construction in step four. 

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Take the fabric one and fabric two strips and sew them right sides together. Press the seams open. Cut the fabric one/two strips set into [8] rectangles measuring
1 7/8″ x 3 1/4″.

Step two: Sew the rectangles right sides together so that fabric one is touching fabric two as shown, matching the seam allowance, to make [4] four-patch blocks. Press the seam open. Trim the four-patch blocks to 3 1/4″ square and set them aside for now.

Step three: Sew the fabric three strips together into a strip set, keeping them in order from the top of the set to the bottom. Press the seam allowances open in the opposite direction that you sewed them together. This will keep the grain from twisting and the strip set will be as straight as possible.

Step two

Step four

 

Step four: Take an acrylic ruler and match the 45° line with the top of the strip set as shown, so that the ruler is on an angle from top left to bottom right. Trim the end of the strip set.

Step five

Step five – line up with the 2 1/2″ line

Step five: Line up the 2 1/2″ line of the ruler with the cut side of the strip set, and the 45° line with the bottom of the strip set as shown, and cut a diamond.  Repeat, cutting out [8] diamonds total from the strip set.

Step seven

Step six and seven

Step six: Using a removable marking pen of choice, mark the seam allowance on the wrong side of each piece. This is critical to making the most accurate Y-seams possible, especially for the bias edges.  Note that from this point onwards, you will only be lightly finger pressing the pieces as they are sewn. You will not use the iron until the very last step.

Step seven: Pin the fabric one quarter square triangle to the diamond sections, matching the marked seam allowances. Sew the pieces together, through the top dot, and stopping exactly on the marked dot at the bottom. Take a backstitch or two to secure the stitching line.

Step eight: Pin a second diamond to the remaining side of the triangle as shown, matching the seam allowances at the dot. Make sure that the seam allowance from the first diamond is pushed to the side so you do not sew through it. Be careful when sewing, as both pieces are sewn together on the bias edge (this is where the walking foot comes in handy). Sew the pieces together, again sewing through the top dot at stopping exactly on the bottom dot and taking a backstitch or two.

Step nine: Fold the piece so that the diamonds are now right sides together and the background triangle has a fold. Match and pin the seam allowances, pushing the previous two seam allowances up and out of the way. Start your seam with the needle exactly through the top dot ( I do this by hand to make sure it is precise) and then take a pair of stitches, backstitch, and then continue sewing all the way through the bottom. I use the pin at the bottom to feed the bottom points evenly through.

Note: When you open the block and look at it from the right side, there should be no puckers in the junction of the Y. If there is, take a look to make sure the stitches do not extend past the dots into the seam allowance. If this is the case, carefully remove ONLY the stitch n the seam allowance. Once it is out then the block will lay flat without puckers. If you notice that the seam allowances do not all meet exactly in the centre, DO NOT WORRY. It is okay to have a gap of about a stitch length. This will be dealt with in the final pressing stage.

Step ten: Repeat the y-seam technique for all of the diamonds and triangles, to make [4] Star Quarters. Finger press the seam allowances of the first two seams towards the triangle, and the seam allowance of the diamonds all in the same direction. I tend to press them counter-clockwise, as this just seems to be the way the fabric wants to flow.

Step eleven: Using the same y-seam technique, sew [2] star quarters together with a
four-patch block, making sure that the fabric two section of the four-patch block is at the junction of the y-seam. Sew a second four-patch to the opposite side as shown to make [2] half stars.

Step twelve

Step twelve

Step twelve: Sew the half stars together, sewing the four-patch-to-diamond seams first using the same y-seam technique and being very careful not to catch any of the seam allowances in the seam. Then fold the piece in half and match the centre seam of the diamonds carefully, making sure that the seam allowances in this case are still spinning in the same counter-clockwise direction, and sew from dot to dot, backstitching at either end.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
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Stacey

About Stacey from Stacey in stitches

By day, Stacey is an unassuming X-Ray Technologist in hot pink scrubs living in beautiful British Columbia. By night (and naptime) she transforms into an experienced quilter, pattern writer and designer, whose superpowers are directly related to the amount of thread ends on the floor (that’s what she tells herself). A third generation quilter, Stacey caught the sewing bug early in her life (apparently it’s hereditary) and earned a Diploma of Fashion Production in 2005. Her work has appeared in numerous quilt shows and trunk shows across North America, and her library of patterns can be found on her website.

Connect with Stacey

Website | Instagram

Block twenty-three

Block twenty-three designed by Crystal McGann

Block twenty-three designed by Crystal McGann

Making fabric slabs is a perfect way to use up your little scraps or offcuts and there are endless way to incorporate fabric slabs into any project or block.

Flying geese can be made in several ways – but the no waste flying geese method makes four geese units at a time quickly and easily, with no fabric waste. You don’t need any special gadgets to make them up either, so that’s another bonus!

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Block twenty-three designed by Crystal McGann

Fabric and cutting guide

The scraps used to make the 5" fabric slab

The scraps used to make the 5″ fabric slab

[1] 5″ square (Crystal used a handful of small scraps)
[1] 5 3/4” square of fabric one (Crystal used a grey solid)
[4] 2 3/4″ squares of fabric one (Crystal used a grey solid)
[4] 3 1/8″ squares of fabric two (Crystal used four various prints)

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Take your scraps and sew them together into a square that measures a minimum of 5″ square, then trim to an exact 5″ square.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of the small squares from fabric two. Lay these down on opposite corners of the large square from fabric one, overlapping them in the middle. Sew down a 1/4″ seam on either side of the diagonal lines. Slice through the middle, using the drawn lines as a guide. Press the units, pressing the seams towards the triangles.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Lay a fabric two square down in middle of the unit (on the corner of the original square), overlapping them in the middle. Sew down a 1/4″ seam on either side of the diagonal lines. Slice through the middle, using the drawn lines as a guide.

Step four

Step four

Step four: Press the units, pressing the seams towards the triangles and repeat to complete all [4] geese units. Snip the little corners off to trim up the block.

Step five: Arrange your block out with the flying geese units around the centre square. Sew together in rows and then sew each of the rows together.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.
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IMG_3284

About Crystal from Raspberry Spool

Crystal is the other half of Project 48 Quilt and the creative force behind Raspberry Spool. Her personality and modern, fresh attitude to quilting is shown through her designs, which gives quilters an opportunity to inject their own personality into their quilts as well.

Connect with Crystal

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Block twenty-two

Block twenty-two designed by Amy Gunson

Block twenty-two designed by Amy Gunson

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Block twenty-two designed by Amy Gunson

Fabric and cutting guide

Download the template page here

Print the template pieces page with the printer settings set to no scaling or 100%. Measure the 2” test square on the template page to ensure the page is printed correctly. Neatly cut out the templates. Optionally transfer them to template plastic or adhere them to card-stock to make them stronger.

Cut the following from fabric one (Amy used a navy print):
[2] 1” x 8” rectangles
[8] pieces cut with template A
[8] pieces cut with template B

Cut the following from fabric two (Amy used a pink print):
[1] 1” x 8” rectangle
[4] 1” x 2” rectangles

Cut the following from fabric three (Amy used a grey fabric):
[8] pieces cut with template C
[8] pieces cut with template D
[8] pieces cut with template E

Editors note: if you would prefer to fussy cut the squares instead of crosses,
cut [4] 2″ squares.

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Sew the fabric one rectangle between the [2] 1” x 8” fabric two strips along their 8” sides. Press the seams towards the darker fabric.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Cross-cut the sewn strip at 1” intervals to create [8] 1” x 2” pieced rectangles.

Step three

Step three

Step three: Sew a 1” x 2” fabric one rectangle between [2] 1” x 2” pieced rectangles along their 2” sides to form a center cross block. Press the seams towards the darker fabric. The center cross block will be 2” square including external seam allowance. Make [4] center cross blocks in this way.

Step four

Step four

Step four: Sew a fabric one A piece to one side of the center cross block, then sew another fabric one A piece to the opposite side. Press the seams towards the A pieces. Repeat with all [4] center cross blocks.

Step five

Step five

Step five: Sew fabric one B pieces to the remaining [2] sides of the center cross block to make a diamond. Press the seam towards the fabric one B pieces. Repeat with all [4] units.

Step six

Step six

Step six: Referring to the diagram, sew a fabric three C piece to one side of the pieced diamond. Sew a second fabric three C piece to the opposite side. Press the seams towards the fabric three C pieces. A minor bit of seam will show beyond the C piece. Do not worry about that. It will be helpful with alignment, and we can trim it later. Repeat with all [4] diamonds. Set the pieced unit aside for now.

Step seven

Step seven

Step seven: Sew each fabric three D piece to a fabric three E piece. Press the seams towards the fabric three E pieces. Make [8].

star09

Step eight

Step eight: Using the alignment dots, sew the DE pieces to the sides of the main piece to make a square. Press the seams towards the DE pieces. A minor bit of seam allowance will protude from the sides. We will trim this next. Make [4] blocks.

Step nine: Trim any visible seam allowance from the corners of the squares so they are exactly 5”. Tip: measure from a background corner as these are already true and square.

Step ten

Step ten

Step ten: Arrange the blocks together in [2] rows of [2] as shown in the diagram. Sew the blocks into rows, then sew the rows together to complete your block. Neatly press the seams and enjoy your new block.

Notes

Using a pencil or disappearing fabric marker, transfer the alignment dots from each template to the back of the A, B, C, D and E pieces. Although the pieces have been notched to help with alignment, the marking dots are there so you can pin the pieces together to ensure all of the pieces are correctly aligned.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting.
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise.
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting.
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

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Amy Gunson

About Amy Gunson from Badskirt

Buying a sewing machine on a whim to hem pants, Amy unexpectedly found herself quilting in early-2010. After living in a caravan in Australia for six months, Amy packed her bags again and now lives in Wellington, New Zealand. By day, she’s a production manager for visual effects in film. By night, she’s a quirky homebody who collects vintage plastics like Dymo labellers and kitchen canisters. Her current crafty plans include making her own viewmaster reels and sewing vintage-inspired felt banners. You can see her projects at her blog, Badskirt.

Connect with Amy

Blog | Facebook | Craftsy store

Block twenty-one

Block Twenty-One – Traditional Star block by Linden Vine

Traditional Star Block by Linden Vine

Traditional Star Block by Linden Vine

Introduction

Again with a nine patch of sorts!  I loved the idea of a block within a block so had a play and this is what I came up with.  I hope you’re enjoying our sampler which is almost half over!  Where has the year gone?

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Block twenty-one designed by Linden Vine

Fabric and cutting guide

[1] 3½” square from fabric one (Linden used a dark pink floral)
[2] 4¼” squares from fabric one (Linden used a dark pink floral)
[1] 3½” x 1½” rectangle from fabric two (Linden used a green floral)
[1] 2¼ square from fabric two (Linden used a green floral)
[3] 3½ squares from fabric three (Linden used a white striped tone on tone)
[1] 2¼ square from fabric three (Linden used a white striped tone on tone)
[6] 1½ square from fabric three (Linden used a white striped tone on tone)
[2] 4¼ square from fabric three (Linden used a white striped tone on tone)

Instructions

Step one:
We’re going to start by making the small star.
Take the 2¼ square from fabric two and the 2¼ square from fabric one and make two HST units.  Trim them back to 1½.

Step two:
Take the 3½ x 1½ rectangle from fabric two and one of the 1½ squares from fabric three.
Draw a line diagonally through the middle of the 1½ square and lay on top of the rectangle.

Draw a Line

Stitch on the line (as you would for a flying geese unit); trim ¼ outside the line and press away from the rectangle.

Stitching the Unit Part One

Step three:
Take another 1½ square from fabric three.
Draw a line diagonally through the middle of the 1½ square and lay on top of the other end rectangle – this time on the opposite end.

Stitching the Unit Part Two

Stitch on the line; trim ¼ outside the line and press away from the rectangle.

Small Unit Strip Finished

Step four:
Referring to the picture of the finished block, stitch two 1½ squares from fabric three to a HST unit.  Press away from the HST unit.
Repeat with the final two 1½ squares of fabric three and the HST unit.

Step five:
Referring to the picture of the finished block, stitch the three rows of this small unit together.  Press towards the middle row.

Step six:
Take the 4¼ square from fabric one and the 4¼ square from fabric three and create two HST units.  Trim down to 3½.

Step seven:
Referring to the picture of the finished block, stitch the top row together.  Press to the left (away form the small star unit).
Referring to the picture of the finished block, stitch the middle row together.  Press to the right to ensure the seams nest well when the rows are stitched together.
Referring to the picture of the finished block, stitch the bottom row together.  Press to the left to ensure the seams nest well when the rows are stitched together.

Step eight:
Stitch all three rows together, ensuring the seams nest together nicely.  Press the seams towards the middle row.

Notes

  • This block looks difficult, but if you break it down into its parts and have patience, you’ll be fine!
  • You’ll find starch to be very useful, especially for the small pieces.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting.
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise.
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting.
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

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About Linden from Vine Lines Creative

Linden is one of the creators of Project48Quilt and has been quilting for almost twenty years. Quilting combines her love of fabric and all things symmetrical and she’s enjoying letting loose a little and improvising through her exploration of Modern Quilting. As well as running a creative business consultancy and pattern testing agency, Linden works and teaches at her LQS.

Connect with Linden

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Block twenty

Block twenty designed by Cassandra Madge

Block twenty designed by Cassandra Madge

I chose to design a block with two wonky pinwheels, playing with the concept of wheels and gears all spinning together to create a larger whole. I made several variations of this quilt in EQ7, just by repeating and rotating this block. Adding in an extra piece to the long rectangles made another set of pinwheels.

Pinwheels variations

Pinwheels variations

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Block twenty designed by Cassandra Madge

Fabric and cutting guide

Fabric and cutting guide

Fabric and cutting guide

[2] 3½” x 6½” rectangles from fabric one (Cassie used a peach solid)
[4] 3½” squares from fabric one (Cassie used a peach solid)
[4] 2” squares from fabric one (Cassie used a peach solid)
[4] 2½” x 4½” rectangles from matching fabric (Cassie used various blue prints)
[4] 1½” x 2½” rectangles from matching fabric (Cassie used various red prints)

Instructions

Cassandra Madge-2

Step one

Step one: The pinwheels are made using a “stitch and flip” method, similar to block 7 by Crystal. Position the large pinwheel rectangle right sides together over the 3½” square block, as suggested by the photograph. For a best pinwheel effect, line up ¼” down from the top with one corner of the square (shown on image). The angle is not set, you can make a very skinny pinwheel or a larger one. Pin in place.

Step two

Step two

Step two: With the rectangle facing UP use the edge as your guide for stitching your ¼” seam.

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Step three

Step three: After checking to make sure the rectangle will fill the entire corner, trim away the excess background, press flat and trim the square back to 3½”, using the remaining three sides as your guide. Repeat for the three other large pinwheel squares. Make sure you keep your pinwheels in the same position on the square, so they all spin in the same direction at the end.

Step four

Step four

Step four: Follow the same steps to make the four smaller pinwheels from the 2” background squares, trimming back to 2” as you finish each one. For variety, I angled these ones in the opposite direction to my large pinwheel.

Step five

Step five

Step five: Using the layout as guide sew all the pinwheel blocks together. It is easiest if you sew the squares by starting with the bulky seam under your presser foot. Sew the [2] pairs together, press the seams to opposite sides, and then nest the seams to align the pieces together. After sewing this seam, spin the centre seam open to reduce bulk.

Stitch the long side of one background rectangle to the right side of the large pinwheel and the short side of the second rectangle to the left side of the smaller pinwheel.

Sew the [2] parts together, nesting the rectangle seams together to align the pinwheel blocks. Press this final seam open.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

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Cassandra Madge

About Cassie from Cassandra Madge

After crafting for almost my whole life, I discovered quilting about 4 years ago and I have been an addict ever since. I love colour, pattern, and quilting most of all. Last year I launched my longarm quilting business, Juicy Quilting, and I am having so much fun helping quilters from all over Australia finish off their beautiful creations.

Connect with Sam

Website | FacebookInstagram | Long arm quilting

Block nineteen

Block nineteen designed by Crystal McGann

Block nineteen designed by Crystal McGann

Here we are about to step into our first foray into curves. These are my favourite curves – freehand and never perfect. Like I always say, let the perfection go and enjoy it.

I hope you enjoy this style of curves, particularly if you haven’t tried it before. When I trimmed my units back, I cut them fairly uniformly, but of course you  you found go wild with the trimming!

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Block nineteen designed by Crystal McGann

Fabric and cutting guide

[4] 6” squares of fabric one (Crystal used a blue print)
[4] 6″ squares of fabric two (Crystal used four various prints)

Instructions

Step one

Step one

Step one: Stack a fabric one square on top of a fabric two square, both facing up on your cutting mat. Using your rotary blade, slice a curve through both fabrics using the above picture as a guide.

Step two

Step two

Step two: Place the inside piece from fabric two and the outside piece from fabric one right sides together and sew them together. If you are sewing curves for the first time, it might look wrong. but trust me, you are doing it right!

Step three

Step three

Step three: Gently sew the curved seam together, matching at the middle – it should fit nicely back into itself. Be careful not to stretch the pieces and press your seams well to the inside corner. Trim your block back to 5”.

Step four

Step four

Step four: Continue until you have made [4] curved units. Sew these units together to complete your pinwheel block.

Notes

Swap your pieces around for a second block!

Swap your pieces around for a second block!

The cutting guide I have provided will actually make enough for two blocks. Just use the inside piece from fabric one and the outside piece from fabric two and put it together in the same way.

General instructions to complete your Project 48 quilt blocks

  • Remember to always read the block tutorial in full before starting
  • Seam allowances are ¼” unless stated otherwise
  • All blocks are 9” finished. If you need to square your blocks once they are completed, trim back to 9½” using a square ruler.
  • Always press your fabrics before starting
  • Press your seams to the dark side or to reduce bulk (unless otherwise noted) at each stage.

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About Crystal from Raspberry Spool

Crystal is the other half of Project48Quilt and the creative force behind Raspberry Spool. Her personality and modern, fresh attitude to quilting is shown through her designs, which gives quilters an opportunity to inject their own personality into their quilts as well.

Connect with Crystal

Website | Facebook | Instagram

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